HALLUX VALGUS

BUNIONS: WHAT ARE THEY AND WHAT CAUSES THEM?

Hallux valgus, a condition better known as a “bunion,” is the most common reason for seeing a foot surgeon. It involves a progressive and uncomfortable deformity of the joint at the base of the big toe. It is estimated that the condition affects 10% of the population and the majority of those affected are women typically 40 years of age or older.

While genes are often blamed for bunions, the main risk factors are the presence of certain chronic conditions and wearing shoes that compress the foot.

SYMPTOMS

Hallux valgus causes an abnormal deviation of the big toe toward the second toe. The deformity causes a bony bump to form that can be extremely painful. It can affect your ability to walk and wear shoes. In some cases, rubbing on the inside of the shoe can lead to subcutaneous inflammation, causing redness and sensitivity in the area. The diagnosis can usually be confirmed through a clinical exam. X-rays are often prescribed to evaluate the severity of the bunion and determine the best course of treatment.

Hallus valgus – Most frequently asked questions

TREATING HALLUX VALGUS

In the vast majority of cases, surgical correction of a bunion involves an osteotomy, where the surgeon cuts and realigns the affected bone. The exact surgical technique used is determined by the severity and angle of the deformity, as well as the patient’s specific anatomy. Selecting the right technique requires in-depth knowledge of the biomechanics of the foot.

Long dreaded for its long and painful recovery period, bunion correction surgery has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years. Dr. Hobeychi is known for his thorough approach and extensive expertise in the field. He uses minimally invasive techniques that allow patients to get back on their feet the same day—without pain, casts, or crutches. The procedure is performed under local anesthesia with sedation, and both feet can be operated on at the same time.

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